Psychoanalytic Training


DALLAS PSYCHOANALYTIC CENTER: EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 2015
The Dallas Psychoanalytic Center (DPC) provides a range of psychoanalytic educational opportunities. Over the past several years new educational options have been designed to provide flexibility and serve a variety of situations and interests—both clinical and academic.

For those seeking psychoanalytic education for clinical purposes, DPC is committed to the belief that the combination of didactics (the 5 year curriculum of courses), a personal psychoanalytic experience (a training analysis), and supervised clinical work (control cases) provides the optimal educational experience. This is referred to as the Tripartite Educational Model. Furthermore, experience has taught us that the simultaneous immersion in these three components permits the ideal educational synergy. DPC strives to create such conditions for its clinical candidates.

DPC is an accredited training facility of the American Psychoanalytic Association (APsaA), which defines educational standards. Compliance with those standards is required to maintain DPC accreditation and for our graduates to be recognized as psychoanalysts by the APsaA. Yet, there are controversies within the APsaA, and one of those has to do with the requirement that a trainee’s personal analysis and clinical case supervision must be conducted by more senior analysts who have been qualified as Training and Supervising Analysts (TSA’s). While many of us within DPC do not agree with this standard, we are concerned that failure to comply with it risks the possibility that the APsaA might not recognize our graduates. Therefore, despite our questions about the merits of the TSA system, we urge our candidates to comply to ensure that the time, effort and expense of an analytic education get full recognition by the APsaA.

The current requirements for graduation as a psychoanalyst from DPC and eligibility for Active Membership in the APsaA are as follows:

  1. Completion of five-year course of didactics.
  2. Supervised treatment of at least 3 control cases. Each case should have at least 50 hours of supervision with three different TSA's with evidence of obtained competency to independently analyze patients of both sexes who are engaged in a psychoanalytic process.
  3. A personal/training analysis with a TSA or an analyst who has obtained a waiver per APsaA requirements.

In this context DPC will be offering the following educational options for a class of candidates we expect to matriculate in September of 2015.

Track 1. Full Candidacy:
The candidate’s goal is to become a practicing psychoanalyst by the most direct route: Track 1 candidates are engaged at the beginning of the first year in all components of analytic training leading toward becoming a graduate psychoanalyst, as follows:

  1. Takes all didactic courses for the five-year curriculum.
  2. Begins supervision with a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst (TSA) of current psychoanalytic psychotherapy cases in preparing to initiate a psychoanalytic case, learning how to deepen the treatment, and practice development.
  3. Engages in a personal/training analysis with a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst (TSA) or with an analyst who has obtained a waiver to serve in this role.

Track 2. Part Time Candidacy:
These candidates are approved for full candidacy with the candidate’s goal of completing all aspects of the tripartite program and becoming a practicing psychoanalyst, but with approval for delaying some classes and/or delaying acceptance of some control patients. Delay of any of the components of the tripartite system may lead to delay of graduation.

These candidates are approved for full candidacy with the candidate’s goal of completing all aspects of the tripartite program and becoming a practicing psychoanalyst, but with approval for delaying some classes and/or delaying acceptance of some control patients. Delay of any of the components of the tripartite system may lead to delay of graduation.

Track 2 is for candidates who prefer to move more slowly through their training and/or who do not fully satisfy the requirements of a Track 1 candidate (are not in a personal analysis with a TSA). They are required to be engaged in the following from early in the first year:
  1. Begins the course of didactics, but, with approval, may delay taking certain classes and pick these up at a later date.
  2. Begins supervision with a psychoanalyst of current psychoanalytic psychotherapy cases in preparation of initiating a psychoanalytic case, learning how to deepen the treatment, and practice development. Track 2 candidates may delay taking control psychoanalytic cases.
  3. Begins a personal analysis from the beginning of the first year of training. This analyst does not have to be a TSA or have obtained a waiver. However, Track 2 candidates must enter a personal/training analysis with a TSA by the beginning of the third year of training.

Track 3. Early Admission Candidacy: These candidates are approved to begin classes and encouraged to begin or continue personal analysis and to embark on psychoanalytic supervision/mentorship while completing residency, graduate school, and postdoctoral programs. Track 3 candidates are awaiting achievement of licensure and readiness to begin clinical practice, at which time they may apply to become a Track 1 or Track 2 candidate with the eventual goal of becoming a practicing psychoanalyst.

Track 3 is for candidates who wish to enter psychoanalytic training, but who currently continue in a psychiatric residency, graduate school, or postdoctoral programs and are awaiting the achievement of licensure required for independent clinical practice. When licensure has been completed, the candidate may enter Track 1 or Track 2 with the eventual goal of becoming a graduate psychoanalyst.

Track 4. Educational Candidacy:
Intended for clinicians interested in psychoanalysis who have not (or have not yet) made the decision to become practicing psychoanalysts, as well as for academics and professionals inside and outside mental health disciplines. Approval is given for courses on theory and development. Clinicians are encouraged to be in supervision and in personal analysis. They may request approval to participate in techniques and clinical classes.

While all non-clinical Track 4 candidates are encouraged to enter personal psychoanalysis or psychoanalytic psychotherapy to enhance understanding of psychoanalysis, if the goal is to become a Psychoanalytic Scholar a course of psychoanalytic psychotherapy is required.

If a Track 4 candidate requests and is approved to move to Track 1 or Track 2, all the requirements of that track would apply.

Track 4 is designed for the following candidates:
  1. Clinicians who are interested in psychoanalytic approaches, but have not made the decision to become a practicing psychoanalyst. This route offers the flexibility of beginning a psychoanalytic course of study without initially committing to become a practicing psychoanalyst. These candidates will be exposed to didactics and are encouraged to enter a personal analysis and supervision so that they may determine whether they wish to move toward becoming a Track 1 or Track 2 candidate. If a Track 4 candidate requests and is approved to move to Track 1 or Track 2, all of the requirements of that track would apply.
  2. Mental health professionals who wish to deepen their understanding of psychoanalytic approaches, but who do not plan to move toward full psychoanalytic training as a Track 1 or Track 2 candidate. This group of candidates is also encouraged to be in supervision and in a personal psychoanalytic treatment.
  3. Academics who wish to be exposed to psychoanalytic thinking. If the goal is to complete a program as a Psychoanalytic Scholar, a course of psychoanalytic therapy or analysis is required.

NOTE TO ALL CANDIDATES

Psychoanalytic Training requires expenditure of time, emotional commitment, and money. While costs are rarely recouped in clinical practice, those who pursue training are rewarded by deep personal and professional enrichment. Candidates take on the cost of tuition (currently $2400/year for full program), as well as the cost of their own analyses and their own supervision sessions. The length of a personal analysis varies, as does the length of supervisory experiences. DPC class instructors, committee members, and board members are volunteers, but sessions of analysis and supervision are offered as parts of analysts’ practices for fees that are determined according to their own policies and circumstances. Most analysts consider fee reductions for some portion of their practices. Candidates consider their own financial resources and discuss them with potential supervisors and personal analysts to come to an agreement about fees.

If you have further questions at this time, we would encourage you to speak with a DPC candidate or analyst about their own experience with these financial issues. If you do not know anyone to speak with, we can make someone available to you. Please contact our Executive Administrator,

Elizabeth Buchanan, M.B.A. at dallaspsychoanalyticcenter@gmail.com to arrange a conversation to do so.





5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, Texas 75390-9070 tel: 214-566-5083 dallaspsychoanalyticcenter@gmail.com
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